• Arlington CVB Study Shows Positive Tourism Results

     
    POSTED August 24, 2016
     

Almost 14 million visitors spent an estimated $1.4 billion last year in Arlington, Texas, according to a study conducted by Longwoods International. This study was prepared for the Arlington Convention & Visitor’s Bureau with a mission to provide an overview of Arlington’s tourism business in 2015. It included information about overnight and day visitors, how much visitors were spending and other relevant trends.

“As Arlington undergoes a transformation, we can see that travel and tourism continue to experience significant growth,” says Ron Price, president and CEO of the Arlington Convention & Visitors Bureau. “Continuing to expand upon Arlington tourism options with new projects like Texas LIVE! and others is a key element of success to properly compete with comparable destinations.”

In 2015, Arlington had 3.9 million visitors and of those, an estimated 56 percent stayed overnight, while 44 percent came for day visits.

“We use the results of this study to gather visitor information and assess the impact of our ongoing tourism efforts,” says Decima Mullen, senior director of marketing and public relations for the Arlington CVB. “This is a positive testament that those efforts are continuing to build upwards, creating a stronger economy for our community while consistently offering our visitors memorable experiences.”

The average event-goer spends long days sitting in meetings or professional development sessions, followed by an hour or two of standing and sipping cocktails. But holding your next big event at a spa resort opens a realm of possibilities for wellness breaks. Moving the action from the boardroom to the steam room can improve morale by combining business with pleasure—while also boosting attendees’ health. 

 

 Seattle is young and ever evolving, a dynamic city where newness is an integral part of the culture. And it has a long, proud history of hospitality.

In the early 1850s, Chief Seattle welcomed strangers to the banks of Puget Sound. Because of his kindness, they named their new settlement on Elliott Bay after him. “Seattle is a new city with an ancient culture,” notes Ken Workman, Chief Seattle’s great, great, great, great grandson. “It’s less than two grandmas old, as we like to say.” 

 

Many see Portland as a progressive city. No event venues are likely more in line with that world view than the two run by Ecotrust Events. Ecotrust, the events branch’s overarching nonprofit, leads a staggering number of social equity, economic opportunity, and environmental programs, from supporting Native American land rights to building intergenerational wealth for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) individuals. What does this have to do with hosting a corporate meeting? Everything.