• 2014 Annual National Canadian Tourism Convention Recap

     
    POSTED June 4, 2014
     

The 2014 annual national Canadian tourism convention took place at the Vancouver Trade and Convention Centre in Vancouver in May this year. The event welcomed 475 tour operators and wholesalers from all corners of the tourism industry, including hotels, airlines, tour guide companies and tourism associations across Canada. 

"We do these back-to-back meetings for three days," said Dayna Miller, director of sales and travel trade for Tourism Vancouver. "We individually meet up with 70 different travel buyers." The event hosted meetings among sellers and buyers from 28 different countries where they were able to trade, discuss and catalogue information in several short meetings.

Each year, Tourism Vancouver gathers the information presented at these meetings and uses it to compile marketing information about new trends among travelers and the tourism industry. While the company mainly focuses on selling Vancouver as a tourism destination, it also uses the information to promote and sell nearby destinations and locations. 

The average event-goer spends long days sitting in meetings or professional development sessions, followed by an hour or two of standing and sipping cocktails. But holding your next big event at a spa resort opens a realm of possibilities for wellness breaks. Moving the action from the boardroom to the steam room can improve morale by combining business with pleasure—while also boosting attendees’ health. 

 

 Seattle is young and ever evolving, a dynamic city where newness is an integral part of the culture. And it has a long, proud history of hospitality.

In the early 1850s, Chief Seattle welcomed strangers to the banks of Puget Sound. Because of his kindness, they named their new settlement on Elliott Bay after him. “Seattle is a new city with an ancient culture,” notes Ken Workman, Chief Seattle’s great, great, great, great grandson. “It’s less than two grandmas old, as we like to say.” 

 

Many see Portland as a progressive city. No event venues are likely more in line with that world view than the two run by Ecotrust Events. Ecotrust, the events branch’s overarching nonprofit, leads a staggering number of social equity, economic opportunity, and environmental programs, from supporting Native American land rights to building intergenerational wealth for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) individuals. What does this have to do with hosting a corporate meeting? Everything.