Two new members have stepped up to Destination Gettysburg’s board of directors.

The CVB recently elected Andrea Proulx, director, sales and marketing, Gettysburg Hotel and Bryan Johnson, CTA, general manager, Country Inn & Suites By Carlson hotel to serve three-year terms on the board, starting July 1.

“We’re excited to have Andrea and Bryan on the board to help establish the direction of Destination Gettysburg as the organization looks to grow tourism as the county’s top industry,” says Norris Flowers, president of Destination Gettysburg.

Destination Gettysburg recently acknowledged outgoing board members Deb Adamik of Main Street Gettysburg and Leonard Loski of Gettysburg Area Retail Merchants Association Gettysburg for their service on the board.

In other news, on July 1, Tammy Myers, president, Gettysburg Heritage Center, became the board’s chairwoman, taking the place of immediate past chairman Max Felty, Gettysburg Group Reservations. Del Gudmestad of Mulligan MacDuffer Adventure Golf was elected chairman-elect, Mike Hanson of the Gaslight Inn B&B as treasurer and Mary Lynn Martin of Hickory Bridge Farm as secretary.

“We have an exciting year ahead as we strive to reach new and younger visitors to Adams County by marketing a variety of experiences throughout the region,” says Flowers.

The average event-goer spends long days sitting in meetings or professional development sessions, followed by an hour or two of standing and sipping cocktails. But holding your next big event at a spa resort opens a realm of possibilities for wellness breaks. Moving the action from the boardroom to the steam room can improve morale by combining business with pleasure—while also boosting attendees’ health. 

 

 Seattle is young and ever evolving, a dynamic city where newness is an integral part of the culture. And it has a long, proud history of hospitality.

In the early 1850s, Chief Seattle welcomed strangers to the banks of Puget Sound. Because of his kindness, they named their new settlement on Elliott Bay after him. “Seattle is a new city with an ancient culture,” notes Ken Workman, Chief Seattle’s great, great, great, great grandson. “It’s less than two grandmas old, as we like to say.” 

 

Many see Portland as a progressive city. No event venues are likely more in line with that world view than the two run by Ecotrust Events. Ecotrust, the events branch’s overarching nonprofit, leads a staggering number of social equity, economic opportunity, and environmental programs, from supporting Native American land rights to building intergenerational wealth for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) individuals. What does this have to do with hosting a corporate meeting? Everything.