On Thursday, June 25, James Howard performed his routine morning cleaning duties on the Atlantic City Boardwalk, when he witnessed a purse snatching.

In that moment, Howard, a General Maintenance employee, shouted at the suspect and then went to help the woman. At that time, he also radioed his crew and supervisor. With his help, two members of the crew—Eddie Cruz and Javier Figueroa—and Wilfredo Cintron, supervisor, helped in the search and arrest of the suspect, as well as recovery of the victim’s purse.

This week, the New Jersey Casino Reinvestment Development Authority awarded the four men, who typically work from 4 a.m.–12 p.m. every day, for their actions.

“They were ready to take action when they saw something happening and that’s something very few people would do, frankly,” says John Palmieri executive director, CRDA.  “They went above and beyond their call of duty.” 

These types of actions are what help to keep the city safe, encouraging planners to host meetings and events within the area. 

The average event-goer spends long days sitting in meetings or professional development sessions, followed by an hour or two of standing and sipping cocktails. But holding your next big event at a spa resort opens a realm of possibilities for wellness breaks. Moving the action from the boardroom to the steam room can improve morale by combining business with pleasure—while also boosting attendees’ health. 

 

 Seattle is young and ever evolving, a dynamic city where newness is an integral part of the culture. And it has a long, proud history of hospitality.

In the early 1850s, Chief Seattle welcomed strangers to the banks of Puget Sound. Because of his kindness, they named their new settlement on Elliott Bay after him. “Seattle is a new city with an ancient culture,” notes Ken Workman, Chief Seattle’s great, great, great, great grandson. “It’s less than two grandmas old, as we like to say.” 

 

Many see Portland as a progressive city. No event venues are likely more in line with that world view than the two run by Ecotrust Events. Ecotrust, the events branch’s overarching nonprofit, leads a staggering number of social equity, economic opportunity, and environmental programs, from supporting Native American land rights to building intergenerational wealth for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) individuals. What does this have to do with hosting a corporate meeting? Everything.