The Ritz-Carlton, Philadelphia will undergo a complete transformation later this year.

Architect and interior designer Wimberly Interiors is leading the project for the Avenue of the Arts-located hotel. Renovations include new guest rooms and meeting spaces a refreshed lobby experience and public spaces, and a new restaurant, bar and lounge. The project is slated begin this month and finish in spring 2016.

The facelift will focus on the hotel’s history—it was originally built as a reproduction of the Pantheon when it opened in 1908 as The Girard Trust Company. The design will feature neutral colors, textures and materials of money and currency, with pops of metallic and bronze and will bring a fresh and sophisticated feel to the hotel. Artwork and guest amenities will reflect the heart and soul of Philadelphia.

Guest rooms will be updated with brand-new spaces for work and relaxation with luxurious fabrics in a neutral color palate. Green and blue along with bronze and nickel will finish of the space.

Meeting areas will be designed with neutral colors that flow through each function room. The hotel’s history will again be reflected here with motifs from the building in the furniture details.

Updates to the lobby, lounge, restaurant and bar will come at the end of the renovation cycle; more details will be shared when available. The hotel will remain open throughout the renovation.

The average event-goer spends long days sitting in meetings or professional development sessions, followed by an hour or two of standing and sipping cocktails. But holding your next big event at a spa resort opens a realm of possibilities for wellness breaks. Moving the action from the boardroom to the steam room can improve morale by combining business with pleasure—while also boosting attendees’ health. 

 

 Seattle is young and ever evolving, a dynamic city where newness is an integral part of the culture. And it has a long, proud history of hospitality.

In the early 1850s, Chief Seattle welcomed strangers to the banks of Puget Sound. Because of his kindness, they named their new settlement on Elliott Bay after him. “Seattle is a new city with an ancient culture,” notes Ken Workman, Chief Seattle’s great, great, great, great grandson. “It’s less than two grandmas old, as we like to say.” 

 

Many see Portland as a progressive city. No event venues are likely more in line with that world view than the two run by Ecotrust Events. Ecotrust, the events branch’s overarching nonprofit, leads a staggering number of social equity, economic opportunity, and environmental programs, from supporting Native American land rights to building intergenerational wealth for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) individuals. What does this have to do with hosting a corporate meeting? Everything.