A 1968 Shelby convertible, a 1931 Bugatti Royale and a number of classic Corvettes paraded through the Hershey Harrisburg Region July 30–Aug. 2 and resulted in an estimated economic impact of $10.5 million.

Specifically, the items were part of the Mecum Auctions, which happen across the United States at different points of the year and sell collector cars, motorcycles, tractors and collectibles. This auction took place at the PA Farm Show Complex & Expo Center and saw $20.5 million in sales—an overall sell-through rate of 67 percent.

Overall a total of 1,016 vehicles, 135 motorcycles, 107 tractors and 405 Road Art items were offered for sale during 20-hours of auction coverage broadcast on NBC Sports Network. It’s estimated that an audience of 20,000 registered bidders and spectators attended the event. This year’s results rival Mecum’s record-breaking first-time event for northeast in Harrisburg in 2014.

“It was great to see that the crowds at this year’s Harrisburg auction easily rivaled that of our inaugural event in 2014,” says Dana Mecum, founder and president, Mecum Auctions. “With so many registered bidders present, bidding remained steadily competitive and kept sales strong.”

The average event-goer spends long days sitting in meetings or professional development sessions, followed by an hour or two of standing and sipping cocktails. But holding your next big event at a spa resort opens a realm of possibilities for wellness breaks. Moving the action from the boardroom to the steam room can improve morale by combining business with pleasure—while also boosting attendees’ health. 

 

 Seattle is young and ever evolving, a dynamic city where newness is an integral part of the culture. And it has a long, proud history of hospitality.

In the early 1850s, Chief Seattle welcomed strangers to the banks of Puget Sound. Because of his kindness, they named their new settlement on Elliott Bay after him. “Seattle is a new city with an ancient culture,” notes Ken Workman, Chief Seattle’s great, great, great, great grandson. “It’s less than two grandmas old, as we like to say.” 

 

Many see Portland as a progressive city. No event venues are likely more in line with that world view than the two run by Ecotrust Events. Ecotrust, the events branch’s overarching nonprofit, leads a staggering number of social equity, economic opportunity, and environmental programs, from supporting Native American land rights to building intergenerational wealth for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) individuals. What does this have to do with hosting a corporate meeting? Everything.