Blame it on the eight seasons of “Portlandia” or simply on the way people rave about the city when they return from visiting. Portland is experiencing a hotel boom. Collectively, the recent wave in hotel development has resulted in an increase in room inventory of nearly 50 percent since 2016.

There are five projects currently underway in the central city, and 13 properties have opened in the city since 2018. Those openings include three hip new hotels, below, that made their debut during the pandemic. Think of these less as conference hotels and more as centers of conviviality for small groups, with Portland’s ample venues and gathering spots just steps away. 

Lolo Pass

Across the river from downtown, Lolo Pass offers an upscale hybrid hostel experience in one the hippest and coolest areas of the city. With 87 rooms capable of hosting 282 guests in private and shared quarters, this new property offers options for every budget in the city’s dynamic Central Eastside District. A seasonal rooftop bar with amazing views and a lobby restaurant and coffee bar rounds out the property. Lolo Pass’ enviable location on Burnside puts it steps away from some of the city’s most popular businesses such as Revolution Hall, culinary icon Cathy Whims’ Nostrana Italian restaurant, and the popular hipster bar hangout The Sandy Hut. Discounts are available for bookings of eight beds or more. Meeting space: shared and private rooms 

Hotel Grand Stark

Perched in Portland’s Central Eastside District, across the river from the city’s downtown core, Hotel Grand Stark is a 57-room historic property that has been carefully reimagined back to its hospitality roots. The 1906 building is a four-story structure that was originally built as a hotel and housed a legendary local furniture manufacturer for the past 80 years. 

The hotel also is home to two food and beverage concepts—the Grand Stark Deli and the forthcoming Bar Chamberlain—developed in partnership with the local culinary creative minds at Submarine Hospitality. The former pays homage to deli culture, incorporating the best of local Pacific Northwest ingredients and serving an approachable all-day menu from morning until late. Bar Chamberlain harkens back to the era of classic hotel bars featuring expertly crafted cocktails alongside a progressive wine list anchored by a menu of craveable snacks and comforting dinners. Meeting space: 800 square feet. 

Moxy Portland Downtown

With 179 guest rooms, Moxy Portland Downtown is bordered by the Pearl and Culture districts, just blocks away from the world’s largest independent bookstore, Powell’s City of Books. When guests check in at the bar in the bright, open lobby, they receive a complimentary cocktail or coffee. They also can take advantage of Plug and Meet gathering areas with modern ergonomic seating, large writing walls and 56-inch televisions for presentation projection. Other amenities include three food carts and a well-stocked bar featuring craft cocktails, wines by the glass, and local brews. Meeting space: 5,000 square feet. 

Built in the vision of streamline modernism and art deco in 1941, the Vogue Theatre has become a hotspot in the heart of Vancouver’s entertainment district—a region known for its progressive hospitality and historic charm. “It’s a national registered historic site in Canada,” says Matt Friesen, general manager of the theater. While it is primarily a concert venue hosting artists such as Steve Lacy and Steve Earle & The Dukes, the Vogue’s nearly 10,000 square feet of space and mission to offer the utmost friendly customer service makes it a perfect venue for your next event. 

 

WeVenture, a national tour operating company, has expanded its offerings to include four Seattle tours that immerse visitors in the city’s vibrant cultural scene. The company, which launched nationally earlier this year, has tours in 10 other U.S. cities including New York City, Miami, Denver, New Orleans, and Los Angeles. The Seattle tours can be an easy and fun add-on to any event in the Emerald City.

 

When Eli Dahlin and Ezra Wicks bought the space of the restaurant they worked at in February 2020, the pandemic put their plans on hold like it did many other establishments. 

After slow-moving construction throughout 2020, they were finally able to open the doors of their new natural wine bar, Light Sleeper, in December that year. Dahlin and Wicks were involved in the natural wine movement for over a decade, making these practices the forefront of the establishment.