• Whitney Peak Hotel Reveals Renovation

     
    POSTED August 30, 2016
     

The Whitney Peak Hotel is ringing in their incredibly successful first two years of operation with a newly-completed renovation. In order to meet the growing demand for meeting space in a non-smoking, non-gaming environment the Whitney Peak Hotel’s renovation has more than doubled the hotel’s meeting capacity.

“In the two years since we have opened, we have welcomed more than 100,000 guests to our unique property,” said Niki Gross, managing director. “With our expansion last year – doubling the number of guest rooms to 310 – we can better accommodate larger groups. Now we have the expansive meeting space to match, and we look forward to delivering a one-of-a-kind, world-class event experience for both visitors and the local community.”

Miles Construction, the general contractor for the hotel’s renovation project, has been their contractor on all phases of the hotel’s development.

“This project has been a fulfilling one for us at Miles because we are helping to change the face of downtown Reno,” Cary Richardson, vice president of business operations for Miles Construction said. “With these renovations completed, it really makes the hotel a premier location for events and meetings in Reno, which we hope will attract new business and help build the overall economy of our region.”

The project, which encompasses the entire third floor, has resulted in nearly 12,000 square feet of new event and meeting space. Ten air walls allow the space to be subdivided up to eight separate areas, room sizes vary from 350 square feet to a ballroom just under 5,000 square feet. Making it adaptable for a range of meetings and events.

The meeting space has a lighting control system run from touch-screen key pads, the first of its kind in Northern Nevada. Each key pad has the ability to control the entire space when the doors are open, or each room individually when sectioned off. The space also features custom-printed distressed brick wallpaper, crystal chandeliers, lighting fixtures utilizing Edison light bulbs, and a one-piece, Cypress tree coss-section that is now the check-in desk countertop.

The hotel’s expansion was unveiled in conjunction with their second anniversary celebration in July. This new space, and Whitney Peak’s unique amenities, have elevated its profile and helped it maintain strong occupancy numbers.

The average event-goer spends long days sitting in meetings or professional development sessions, followed by an hour or two of standing and sipping cocktails. But holding your next big event at a spa resort opens a realm of possibilities for wellness breaks. Moving the action from the boardroom to the steam room can improve morale by combining business with pleasure—while also boosting attendees’ health. 

 

 Seattle is young and ever evolving, a dynamic city where newness is an integral part of the culture. And it has a long, proud history of hospitality.

In the early 1850s, Chief Seattle welcomed strangers to the banks of Puget Sound. Because of his kindness, they named their new settlement on Elliott Bay after him. “Seattle is a new city with an ancient culture,” notes Ken Workman, Chief Seattle’s great, great, great, great grandson. “It’s less than two grandmas old, as we like to say.” 

 

Many see Portland as a progressive city. No event venues are likely more in line with that world view than the two run by Ecotrust Events. Ecotrust, the events branch’s overarching nonprofit, leads a staggering number of social equity, economic opportunity, and environmental programs, from supporting Native American land rights to building intergenerational wealth for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) individuals. What does this have to do with hosting a corporate meeting? Everything.