• Wine Tasting in the Gem State

     
    POSTED September 8, 2022
     
    Photo credit: Idaho Wine Tours
  • Wine Tasting in the Gem State

     
    POSTED September 8, 2022
     
    Photo credit: Idaho Wine Tours
  • Wine Tasting in the Gem State

     
    POSTED September 8, 2022
     
    Photo credit: Idaho Wine Tours

Fall is approaching, which means wine harvesting in the U.S. has begun. While wine tours and vineyards are often associated with the rolling hills of California, meeting planners should be sure to check out Idaho—home to an unexpected number of wineries. 

“Most people don’t realize we have about a little over 40-45 wineries in [greater Boise],” says Shari Bray, owner of Idaho Wine Tours. “We cover about 20 of them [in our tours].” 

Based in Meridian, Idaho, the company operates two tours that visit an array of wineries in the area. One tour is the Sunnyslope, which is available seven days a week and typically frequents four wineries. The other tour is the Eagle Foothills & Star, which is only available on Saturdays and guests can expect to visit three wineries that vary from the Sunnyslope tour. 

“Each winery is different on how they handle tastings,” Bray says. In addition to the wine, of course, the tours also explore some of Idaho’s oldest wine areas, providing a historic and local approach to events. Each tour includes transportation ranging from private group pick-up to general transportation from the company’s location in Meridian.

Guests in each tour will spend about an hour at each winery, and the company bases their tours on groups of eight people or more. Between their two buses, they can host up to 23 people for any event from corporate gatherings to bachelorette parties. 

“You get to choose the wineries you’re going to if it’s a private tour,” Bray notes. While groups must choose either the Sunnyslope Tour or the Eagle Foothills & Star Tour, they can pick which wineries they visit within those tours. 

For Bray, wine tasting has been a family affair for years. Before moving to Idaho, she would visit wineries and go to a variety of wine tastings with her daughter in California. However, she says her daughter discovered the wine scene in the Boise area when considering the move up north—and Idaho’s up-and-coming wine scene with great growth potential was the perfect area for this wine-loving mother-daughter pair to explore. 

“I like putting together the tours for the private events; bachelorette parties, birthday parties … corporate events. … I like the aspect of helping people plan,” Bray says. 

The average event-goer spends long days sitting in meetings or professional development sessions, followed by an hour or two of standing and sipping cocktails. But holding your next big event at a spa resort opens a realm of possibilities for wellness breaks. Moving the action from the boardroom to the steam room can improve morale by combining business with pleasure—while also boosting attendees’ health. 

 

 Seattle is young and ever evolving, a dynamic city where newness is an integral part of the culture. And it has a long, proud history of hospitality.

In the early 1850s, Chief Seattle welcomed strangers to the banks of Puget Sound. Because of his kindness, they named their new settlement on Elliott Bay after him. “Seattle is a new city with an ancient culture,” notes Ken Workman, Chief Seattle’s great, great, great, great grandson. “It’s less than two grandmas old, as we like to say.” 

 

Many see Portland as a progressive city. No event venues are likely more in line with that world view than the two run by Ecotrust Events. Ecotrust, the events branch’s overarching nonprofit, leads a staggering number of social equity, economic opportunity, and environmental programs, from supporting Native American land rights to building intergenerational wealth for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) individuals. What does this have to do with hosting a corporate meeting? Everything.